PAPAGENA PRESS

Orchestra








×

Medieval Suite

  • Opus 18a
  • Composed 1984
  • Duration 18-19'
Instrumentation, Flute with:
Piano, 1981
Small Orchestra
Full Orch. lg. score
Full Orch. sm. score

Movements:

  1. Depouillement: Virelai
  2. The Black Knight
  3. The Drunken Friar
  4. On the Betrothal of Princess Isabelle of France, Aged Six Years
  5. Demon's Dance

Notes:

  • Winner, NFA Newly Published Music, 1987.

  • The Medieval Suite was inspired by characters and events described in Barbara Tuchman's A Distant Mirror, a history of fourteenth-century France. It was a violent, bitter century of extensive wars, and Ms. Tuchman sees it as something of a reflection of our own. The first movement, "Virelai", uses parts of a work in that form by Guillaume de Machaut, a French composer of that era. The "Black Knight" was a valiant, violent British prince, barred from his beloved fighting by a wasting disease. The fourteenth century was a low point for the Catholic Church with warring Popes in Rome and Avignon, and "the Drunken Friar" was apparently a common sight. In this movement I have freely adapted and embroidered a Gregorian chant and quoted a well-known round of the time, "Sumer is acumin in". "Princess Isabelle" describes a daughter of the King of France who was engaged at the age of six, sent to England to live permanently, and wed at twelve - a common fate for royal children. The "Demon's Dance" was a desperate marathon dance done by some in hopes of avoiding the Black Plague.
    - K. Hoover.
×

Double Concerto

  • Opus 40
  • Composed 1989
  • Duration 14'

Instrumentation:

  • Solo Violin 1, Solo Violin 2, Violin 1, Violin 2, Viola, Violoncello, Contrabass

Movements:

  1. --
  2. Adagio
  3. --

Notes:

  • Light work, for soloists to enjoy.

  • Commisioned by Southeast Kansas Symphony, Carol Ann Martin, Cond. Premiered by Yfrah Neaman and Paul Carlson with the Symphony at Pittsburg, Kan., Sept. 24, 1989.

  • When two violinists get together to perform with orchestra, it's usually a friendly celebration; a chance for colleagues who value each other's talent and skills to enjoy making music together. It doesn't happen very often, and there isn't a lot of literature to choose from. So, I began to think... if I were one of the players, I would want the piece to be grateful and warm, with lyricism and a sense of playfulness. This is what I have attempted to write.

    The opening movement, after a slow introduction, focuses on two ideas; in the first the strings (or the piano), led by the soloists echoing and chasing each other, build a cluster of sounds by adding on notes above and below. In the second the soloists answer back and forth with arpeggiated chords. The rest of the movement grows out of these ideas, with a harmonic and rhythmic debt to jazz.

    The second movement contains an extended lyric duet for the soloists, accompanied by a muted countermelody and plucked bass notes. The third is more virtuosic with a driving, uneven theme in the solo violins propelled forward by the bass. It also contains a cadenza for two.
    - K. Hoover.

×

Stitch-Te Naku

  • Opus 47
  • Composed 1994
  • Duration 18'

Instrumentation:

  • Solo Cello; 2-2-2-2 4-2-1-0; Pno.(Cel.) Tpt. 2Perc. Str.

Notes:

  • Premiered November 1996 in Rohnert Park, California by Sharon Robinson and the Rohnert Park Orchestra, N. Washburn conducting.

  • VC Concerto based on Pueblo tale of Grandmother Spider who wove the world. One movement is based on the SW Indian creation story about the Spider who wove the world in her web, written for Sharon Robinson.

  • There are many ways of thinking about the world. Mathematics is one. Anyone who has learned a second language knows that not only do words differ, entire concepts do as well. Music has its own meanings and structures, which cannot be reduced to words. Native American stories are another means of perceiving reality. Calling them 'myths', or implying that they are untrue or insignificant blinds us to a rich world of meanings.

    Stitch-te Naku is a story of creation, and of weaving; of Stitch-te Naku, the Spider-Grandmother who wove the world in her web, and all of its features and creatures. As for weaving - we weave cloth, stories, plans; we 'weave the fabric of our lives'. And the Spider, creating her web out of herself, has many resonances: about creativity, and persistence...about a single source of creation.

    Native American storytellers prefer to tell the tale, and let their listeners ponder the implications.

    In my 'tale' I have presented Spider the creator; the weaving-creation of many elements, including birds and animal, and descent into chaos with the sounds of guns. This is followed by a song of mourning, then by renewal, as Stitch-te Naku dances, joined by her creations. Various Native American musical ideas have influenced this work.

    - K. Hoover.

×

Clarinet Concerto

  • Opus 38
  • Composed 1987
  • Duration 22'

Instrumentation:

  • [2212 1 Sax, 2330, 2 Perc, Str]

Movements:

  1. Allehro
  2. Elegy
  3. Allegro vivace

Notes:

  • Three movements, with a debt to big bands and jazz. Written for and premiered by Eddie Daniels with the Santa Fe Symphony September 1987.

  • The Clarinet Concerto was written in 1986-87 for the jazz virtuoso Eddie Daniels. Eddied has an active interest in many kinds of music and performs the classical repertoire as well as improvising brilliantly. In writing this piece I have used material from both traditions. The Concerto is structured in a familiar format of three movements, with numerous elements of jazz and big band sounds - harmonies, rhythms, riffs, and some improvisation. The first and last movements, both lively, frame an Elegy, written on the death of a friend.
    - K. Hoover.

×

Two Sketches

  • Opus 42
  • Composed 1989
  • Duration 12'

Instrumentation:

  • [2223(2) 2210 Pno, Hp, Cel, Timp, Perc, Str]

Movements:

  1. Winter Sands
  2. Turnabout

Notes:

  • Commisioned by the Womens Philharmonic and premiered April 20, 1990 under Joann Falletta.

  • Both of these pieces were begun in 1985 and completed in the fall of 1989. They are extremely different in concept: one is quite visual and impressionistic, and the other is a musical game.

    'Winter Sands' reflects the spare haziness of a winter's walk by the ocean, accompanied by a few seabirds and the sudden rush of waves flung on the beach.

    'Turnabout' is a kind of musical puzzle that fascinates composers for it requires the construction of sounds that make sense forward and backward, as in a palindrome such as 'Madam, I'm Adam' or the word 'radar'. (Bach was particularly brilliant at this, and other such musical games.) The first section begins with march-like motives in the brass, then clusters in the winds and vibraphone, all set against a soft, agitated line in the strings. This string line suddenly grows to encompass the orchestra, passing quickly by like a whirlwind. Then the section grows to a climax and breaks off. The second section begins with a slow, erratic bass line; bits of the first section appear above this and begin to build up to a large climax. As the climax finishes we find ourselves at the end of the first section, and the entire piece proceeds backward note-for-note from that point, whirlwind and all.

    - K. Hoover.

×

Eleni: A Greek Tragedy

  • Opus 36
  • Composed 1986
  • Duration 15'

Instrumentation:

  • [3333 4331 Timp, Perc, Guit, Alto, Str]

Notes:

  • Premiered by the Harrisburg Symphony, Larry Newland conducting, Harrisburg Pennsylvania, Febryary 10, 1987.

  • A tone poem, based on Nicholas Gage's moving book Eleni; combining Greek folk themes and contemporary writing.
  • In 1948, toward the end of the Greek Civil War, Eleni Gatzoyannis was tortured and executed by Communist partisans for smuggling her children out of Greece to join their father in America. Her son, Nicholas Gage, who was eight at that time, became a reporter for The New York Times, and in the early 1980's he returned to Greece to trace the events leading to her death. The result was the extraordinary book, Eleni. I was extremely moved by Mr. Gage's book. Eleni was a heroine, and, like many in the old Greek dramas, an archetype as well.

    To construct this piece, which is both a lament and a tribute, I turned to Greek folk music, in particular from the northwest area of Epiros where Eleni lived. Much of this music is based on intonation and harmony that are foreign to Western ears. Melodies move in a rhapsodic manner, flowing freely between the notes we recognize, while harmonies change little, following the melody closely. Rhythms based on 5 and 7 are common. The clarinet, played in a style resembling that of "klezmer" music, is a constant presence. The folk materials, the dances and songs of the first section eventually dissolve into an area of growing tension, climaxing with the full orchestra. Out of this climax the clarinet reappears, followed by an alto completing the "moirologhia", or funeral lament, which was begun by a solo cello in the first section. The piece ends with an orchestral lament based on motives drawn from the earlier materials.

    - K. Hoover.

×

Night Skies

  • Opus 46
  • Composed 1992

Instrumentation:

  • [4333, 6440, Hp, Timp, Perc, Str]

Notes:

  • This Tone poem premiered January 1994 by the Harrisbutrg Symphony, L. Newland, Music Director; Hoover conducting

  • This orchestral tone poem has grown from a fascination with a singular - and presently popular - watercolor by Henri Edmond Cross (French, 1856-1910), called Landscape with Stars. The Metropolitan Museum of New York, which owns this lovely work, has enlarged it for a poster and reduced it for a card; I particularly love it in its original size and setting. Something about the bold splashing of yellow in the sky renewed my fascination with how art can give us an intense sense of a familiar sight or experience. I began thinking of various ways that night skies affect me, and how I could portray these experiences in sound.

    As I worked on this piece I was also drawn to the nightscapes of Albert Pinkham Ryder (American, 1847-1917) with their mysterious and haunting moons and hazy, sensual forms. This influence is heard in the second section of the work. As I began the third and final area, however, I searched in vain for a similar visual reference, and turned instead to the immense, dramatic stormy sky as I have seen in the Southwest; whirling and churning, then erupting in sudden surges.

    - K. Hoover.

×

Turner Impressions

  • Composed 2003-2006
  • Duration 22'

Instrumentation:

  • 3(dbl. 3Picc.) 3(dbl.E.H.) 3(B.Cl.) 3(Cbsn.) 4 3 3(B.Tbn.) 1; Timp. 3Perc. Pno.(dbl.Hpsch.) Hp. Str.
  • 3333, 4331, 3 Perc., Hp, Pno + Hpsch

Movements:

  1. The Grand Canal
  2. A Steamboat in a Snowstorm
  3. The Music Room
  4. A First Rater

Notes:

  • Inspired by paintings of J. M. W. Turner. This work is also known as 'J. M. W. Turner: Impressions'.

×

Four Winds

  • Composed 2015
  • Premiered 2015

Instrumentation:

  1. Flute, Piano
  2. Flute and Orchestra
  3. Flute and Orchestra with Piano reduction

Movements:

  1. East
  2. South
  3. West
  4. North

Notes:

  • Premiered by Mark Sparks at the 2015 National Flute Association convention in Washington, D.C.
Links:
Flute and Piano
496-00114L, Fl. & Orch.
×

Nocturne Fantasy

  • Opus 13
  • Composed 1977
  • Recorded, CRC 2585 Twentieth Century Works for Flute and Orchestra.
  • Duration 6'

Instrumentation:

  • Flute, Harp, String Orchestra.
×

Summer Night

  • Opus 34
  • Composed 1985
  • Duration 8'

Instrumentation:

  1. Flute, Horn in F, Violin 1, Violin 2, Viola, Violoncello, Contrabass.
  2. Flute, Horn, Piano.

Notes:

  • A single movement, combining a slow and fast dance.

  • Summer Night was completed in July, 1985, and premiered by the New York Concerto Orchestra outdoors in Lincoln Center the following September.

  • It was published by Theodore Presser, with a piano reduction, in 1986.

  • The flute and horn are a rather mismatched pair in many ways. To let their individual qualities sound, I began with a short soliloquy for each. This is followed by a slow dance which grows out of the soliloquies, and then a lively one, as the instruments (or characters, or thoughts) meet and interact.
    - K. Hoover.

×

Psalm 23

  • Opus 21
  • Composed 1981
  • Duration 4'

Instrumentation:

  1. Op.21, SATB, Organ
  2. Op.21a, Fl, Ob, Cl, Bn, 2 Hn, Strings

Notes:

  • Commissioned by Episcopal Diocese of NY. Premiered at Cathedral of St. John the Divine , NY, 1981

  • Psalm 23 has a very personal and unusual history. Written in February, 1981, when my mother was permanently disabled by illness, it was given its first performance on Mother's Day, directed by the Reverend Dennis Michno at All-Saints church in New York. Dennis then obtained a commission from the Episcopal Diocese of New York to orchestrate the work. In this version the piece was first presented at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine during the Fifth Annual Festival of Worship and Music on October 24, 1981, by a chorus of 400 and orchestra. My mother passed away quietly the next day.
    - K. Hoover.